NiceHash advises consumers to avoid using the Phoenix digital ocurrency miner due to the risk of theft

Must Read

Goldman Sachs Survey Shows Ultra-Wealthy Families Are Increasingly Looking To Make Bets On Bitcoin

According to a Goldman Sachs survey on their family offices clients, there is growing acceptance and interest...

Binance Is Hunting for a New CEO — Exchange’s US Venture ‘Looks at Potential IPO Route’

Binance CEO Changpeng “CZ” Zhao has explained in a recent interview that the company is looking to...

Assessing whether Bitcoin’s energy consumption makes sense

After Tesla’s initial Bitcoin investment and payment support for Tesla purchases on 8 February 2021, many critics...

NiceHash, a digital currency hash power broker, has advised its customers to stop using the Phoenix miner instantly due to the risk of scam.

According to a comment from NiceHash, the announcement was inspired by the miner’s developer’s latest operation.

The Phoenix miner is no longer accessible from its initial download source, as per NiceHash. Furthermore, the developer’s valuation on his network is unrelated to the latest download spot. NiceHash points out that:

“This brings the possibility that the Phoenix miner’s author wants to cover its tracks and disappear or even do something malicious. We have immediately disabled Phoenix miner from NiceHash Miner, and we advise everyone to stop using Phoenix miner immediately.”

The creator of the Phoenix miner is uncertain

The case is made even more confusing by the fact that the Phoenix miner’s author is unknown. Around the same period, the app lacks a digital signature, putting future and current users at risk.

Besides that, the hash power broker claims that any download by a third party may be false or deceptive.

As a result, consumers should be cautious if the miner is installed on the same computer as confidential information such as a contact or bank account. Reinstalling the system and allowing the two-factor berification protection tool are also recommended by NiceHash.

This arrives after a short period after the US Department of Justice accused three North Korean citizens with breaking into a number of digital currency companies.

NiceHash was allegedly attacked by the attackers during the December 2017 attack. NiceHash was compromised and damaged 4,736 BTC, which is worth $240 million at the present.

- Advertisement -

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

- Advertisement -

Latest News

Goldman Sachs Survey Shows Ultra-Wealthy Families Are Increasingly Looking To Make Bets On Bitcoin

According to a Goldman Sachs survey on their family offices clients, there is growing acceptance and interest...

Binance Is Hunting for a New CEO — Exchange’s US Venture ‘Looks at Potential IPO Route’

Binance CEO Changpeng “CZ” Zhao has explained in a recent interview that the company is looking to launch a U.S.-based initial public...

Assessing whether Bitcoin’s energy consumption makes sense

After Tesla’s initial Bitcoin investment and payment support for Tesla purchases on 8 February 2021, many critics followed up on the company’s...

El Salvadorians take to the streets to protest Bitcoin law

Protesters calling themselves the Popular Resistance and Rebellion Block have come out against El Salvador’s government passing a law making Bitcoin legal...

Russian metro workers were discovered stealing energy from the subway to mine Bitcoin

After reportedly being found taking electricity from the subway to mine Bitcoin, the head engineer of a Russian Metro system resigned.
- Advertisement -

More Articles Like This